Being in a Rent Pressure Zone: What this means for you – Lexology

Maynooth and Cobh have recently been added as designated “rent pressure zones” for the purposes of the residential tenancies legislation. What does being in a rent pressure zone mean for landlords and tenants? Existing Tenancies In rent pressure zones, rents for existing tenancies can only be increased by a maximum of 4% per annum, unless:

Which tenants can I make pay a 4 per cent rent increase? – Irish Times

Currently, I have three tenants each with their own bedroom and separate tenancy agreement; let’s say their names are Joe (a), Brian (b) and Mary (c). Each of these three current tenancies is of one year’s duration. Joe’s first tenancy commenced on August 1st, 2013, and has been renewed annually since then. Both Brian’s and

Maynooth and Cobh to be subject to rent controls from midnight – thejournal.ie

Image: Sam Boal/Rollingnews.ie Image: Sam Boal/Rollingnews.ie MINISTER FOR HOUSING Simon Coveney has signed orders that will designate Maynooth, Co Kildare, and Cobh, Co Cork as rent pressure zones, which will limit the annual rent increases in these areas to 4%. The expansion was announced at the launch of the Residential Tenancies Board (RTB) expanded rent

Rule changes on renting: what they mean for tenants and landlords – Irish Times

The final act of the Oireachtas before the Christmas recess made significant changes to the positions of landlords and tenants of residential properties. What are the changes to current rents? As of December 24th, 2016, the administrative areas of Cork City Council, Dublin City Council, Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council, Fingal County Council and South Dublin

These are the 23 towns where rent caps will be extended to from midnight – thejournal.ie

Image: Shutterstock/Rawpixel.com Image: Shutterstock/Rawpixel.com FROM MIDNIGHT TONIGHT, the new system of rent caps will be extended to all of Galway city and 23 towns across the country. It means rent can only be raised by a maximum of 4% a year in those areas, at the time of its next review. Housing Minister Simon Coveney